Views from the Treehouse™

accidentallydomesticated:

tehjennismightier:

This makes me wanna do drugs reaallllll baaaaaaaaaad.






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accidentallydomesticated:

tehjennismightier:

This makes me wanna do drugs reaallllll baaaaaaaaaad.

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TumbleOn

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(Source: imgfave)

accidentallydomesticated:

archiemcphee:

Believe it or not, these enormous stingrays aren’t abnormally oversized. They’re Giant Freshwater Stingrays, native to large rivers and estuaries of Southeast Asia. As you may have guessed from the photos, they’re among the very largest freshwater fish in the world. These stingrays can grow to be over 16-feet-long and weigh up to 1,300 lbs. They sport 15-inch-long serrated, venomous stingers, but these creatures are gentle and inquisitive giants who only use their built-in weapon as a last resort for self-defense. They’re also extremely endangered.

Though this could be the largest freshwater fish on the planet, accounts of its existence only emerged in Thai newspapers in the early 1980s. It’s exceedingly rare to see one, in part because it destroys all but the strongest fishing rods and lines. Even if you have the right equipment, the giant freshwater stingray tends to take exception to being hunted and buries itself in the river bottom when hooked.

“They’re inquisitive, they’re not as shy as most other species of fish,” said Zeb Hogan, a conservation biologist with the University of Nevada, Reno. “There aren’t many fish out there that like to be approached, that will stay in one place if they’re close to humans, and the stingrays don’t seem to mind being in close proximity to humans. They don’t in some cases seem to even mind contact.”

Photos courtesy of Zeb Hogan, University of Nevada

Visit Wired to view more photos of and learn much more about the awesome Giant Freshwater Stingrays of Southeast Asia.

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(Source: shinypigeon)

ratak-monodosico:

“It’s been a favorite feeling in my whole life to be able to communicate without talking,” Harry Dean Stanton once said. “Communicating in silence in a powerful thing.” And when you look back on his extensive career, Stanton has spent his life playing roles that hinge on the moments in between. So much of his strength comes from his ability to emote without uttering a single word—his face, his body language, just the way he holds a cigarette speaks volumes above everyone else. With a depth of emotion and personality as cavernous and rough as the wrinkles that have given his face its distinction over the years, Stanton has become an staple of American cinema, working with some of the most iconic directors from David Lynch and Wim Wenders to Arthur Penn and John Huston.   
And in Sophie Huber’s new documentary Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction (released last weekend), we get a closer look at the life and melancholic world of the actor we know and love. At one point in the film, whilst drinking an enormous cup of coffee on the couch together, David Lynch asks him, “How do you see yourself?” to which Stanton responds, “There’s nothing, there is no self.” Typical, Stanton response. But throughout the film, through interviews his interviews, as well as with those he’s worked with, we gain a deeper understanding of the man who claims it “doesn’t matter” how he will be remembered. We also get to see the almost painful tenderness that resides inside him as he croons away singing everything from “Blue Moon” to “Cancion Mixteca.” 
Harry Dean Stanton: Enjoy the Silence

ratak-monodosico:

“It’s been a favorite feeling in my whole life to be able to communicate without talking,” Harry Dean Stanton once said. “Communicating in silence in a powerful thing.” And when you look back on his extensive career, Stanton has spent his life playing roles that hinge on the moments in between. So much of his strength comes from his ability to emote without uttering a single word—his face, his body language, just the way he holds a cigarette speaks volumes above everyone else. With a depth of emotion and personality as cavernous and rough as the wrinkles that have given his face its distinction over the years, Stanton has become an staple of American cinema, working with some of the most iconic directors from David Lynch and Wim Wenders to Arthur Penn and John Huston.   

And in Sophie Huber’s new documentary Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction (released last weekend), we get a closer look at the life and melancholic world of the actor we know and love. At one point in the film, whilst drinking an enormous cup of coffee on the couch together, David Lynch asks him, “How do you see yourself?” to which Stanton responds, “There’s nothing, there is no self.” Typical, Stanton response. But throughout the film, through interviews his interviews, as well as with those he’s worked with, we gain a deeper understanding of the man who claims it “doesn’t matter” how he will be remembered. We also get to see the almost painful tenderness that resides inside him as he croons away singing everything from “Blue Moon” to “Cancion Mixteca.” 

Harry Dean Stanton: Enjoy the Silence

(via velvetant-deactivated20140416)

isitanart:

Happy 87th Birthday to world’s greatest living actor.

isitanart:

Happy 87th Birthday to world’s greatest living actor.

(via velvetant-deactivated20140416)

accidentallydomesticated:

historical-nonfiction:

Crew members of the Apollo 1 rehearsing their water landing, in 1966






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Awesome…reclining.

accidentallydomesticated:

historical-nonfiction:

Crew members of the Apollo 1 rehearsing their water landing, in 1966

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TumbleOn

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Awesome…reclining.

(Source: iliketowastemytime.com)

accidentallydomesticated:

vintagegal:

Robert L. Stern, smoking a cigarette from his self-designed “lovers holder” cigarette holder,1954 






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accidentallydomesticated:

vintagegal:

Robert L. Stern, smoking a cigarette from his self-designed “lovers holder” cigarette holder,1954 

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TumbleOn

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(Source: images.google.com)